Foot and Ankle Center Blog
By FOOT & ANKLE CENTER OF ILLINOIS
October 03, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Care   Heel Spurs  

Have you been experiencing any heel pain or bothersome tenderness without any obvious cause? Although heel spurs themselves sometimes do not cause acute discomfort, they are frequently associated with the painful inflammation known as plantar fasciitis, a condition commonly described as feeling like a knife is wrenching through your foot. Read below for more information on the typical causes, symptoms, and treatments of heel spurs.

What is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is often the result of overstraining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia (the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes), and repeatedly tearing the heel bone membrane. From these actions arises a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. Risk factor for developing the condition include:

  • Possessing any walking gait abnormalities

  • Regularly running or jogging on hard surfaces

  • Wearing poorly fitted or overly worn shoes

  • Wearing shoes that lack arch support

  • Being excessively overweight or obese

What are The Symptoms?

Heel spurs do not carry many symptoms by themselves. However, they are often related to other afflictions, most typically plantar fasciitis. The most common sign of this combo of conditions is a feeling of chronic pain along the bottom or back of the heel, especially during periods of walking, running, or jogging. If you are experiencing this recurring inflammation, it is a good idea to visit your local podiatrist's office and inquire about undergoing an x-ray or ultrasound examination of the foot.

What are the Treatment Options?

The solutions to heel spurs are generally centered around decreasing inflammation and avoiding re-injury. They include:

  • Applying ice on the inflammation

  • Performing stretch exercises

  • Wearing orthotic devices or shoe inserts to relieve pressure off of the spur

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen to relieve pain

  • In extreme cases, surgery can be performed on chronically inflamed spurs

If you are dealing with symptoms of heel spurs or pain in your feet, turn to a podiatrist so that we can get you back on your feet. Don't ignore your pain.

By FOOT & ANKLE CENTER OF ILLINOIS
October 01, 2018
Category: Foot Health
Tags: Ingrown Toenails  

Ingrown toenails are a common problem. Depending on the severity, they can cause everything from mild irritation and discomfort to ingrown toenailinfection and significant pain. Toenails become ingrown when a corner of the nail grows into the skin, and while they are most common in the big toe, they can affect the other toes as well. Although some ingrown toenails can be treated with over-the-counter remedies, if the toe becomes infected or if you have diabetes, a podiatrist may have to remove the ingrown portion of the nail to avoid complications. If you are experiencing this issue, the podiatry and chiropractic team at Foot and Ankle Center of Illinois in Springfield offers treatment options for a range of conditions.

Ingrown Toenail Prevention and Treatment in Springfield, IL

The best way to prevent a toenail from becoming ingrown is to trim them regularly, making sure to cut them neatly straight across and avoid rough, jagged edges. If you have diabetes, even minor podiatry problems like an ingrown toenail or blister can lead to potentially serious complications. In order to keep your feet healthy, visit a podiatrist for regular check-ups and maintenance. Other things you can do to protect yourself from ingrown toenails include wearing comfortable shoes with ample room to move the toes comfortably.

Causes and Risk Factors for Ingrown Toenails

The two most common causes of an ingrown toenail are cutting the toenails too short or at an angle, and wearing uncomfortable or poorly fitting shoes that squeeze the toes. Trauma and the natural shape and growth patterns of your toenails can also make them more susceptible to becoming ingrown.

If the nail becomes infected, a podiatrist may remove the ingrown portion and prescribe medication to treat the infection. Conservative treatments include soaking the foot in warm water and wearing comfortable supportive shoes to relieve pressure on the toes.

Find a Podiatrist

For more information about ingrown toenail treatment and other foot and ankle injuries, contact Foot and Ankle Center of Illinois in Springfield, Decatur, Carlinville, Shelbyville, Taylorville and Sullivan, IL today to schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists or chiropractors.

By FOOT & ANKLE CENTER OF ILLINOIS
August 31, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Arthritis  

Arthritis is a joint condition that affects roughly 54 million American adults according to the Arthritis Foundation. It can show up in joints all around the body, including the feet and toes. When the joints of the feet are affected by inflammation, it affects a patient’s ability to move their toes, bend their feet up or down, and turn on a dime when participating in athletic activities. Learn the steps that you can take to care for arthritic feet and improve your overall foot health.

Arthritis in the Feet
Arthritic joint pain, which is usually caused by an inflammatory reaction, is most commonly felt in the big toe, ankle, and the middle part of the foot. There are many different types of arthritis conditions that could affect the feet, including psoriatic, reactive, and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form—it is caused by the bones rubbing together, making the joints feel stiff and painful. Patients who are overweight are more likely to struggle with arthritic feet, as are seniors. Some people have had arthritis since childhood (juvenile arthritis or JA), making them more likely to develop foot deformities like bunions and struggle with swollen joints.

Arthritis Treatments
Though arthritis isn’t a curable condition, the symptoms can be eased with treatment so that you can continue to walk, jog, exercise, and work without debilitating pain. These are some of the ways your podiatrist may treat arthritis in the feet:

  • An X-ray or other imaging test to examine the condition of the joints.
  • Physical therapy exercises to make the joints more flexible.
  • Orthotic device or shoe for better foot support.
  • Joint injections (corticosteroids).
  • NSAID drugs (anti-inflammatories).
  • Surgery to remove inflamed tissue around the joints (Arthroscopic debridement) or fuse the bones (arthrodesis).

Caring for Your Feet
Seeing a foot doctor is an important part of caring for arthritic feet. But there are also some actions you can take at home to keep your feet and joints in good condition:

  • Get rid of shoes that put too much pressure on your joints, like high heels or sneakers that don’t support the ankles.
  • Soak your feet in warm water with Epsom salt and massage your feet when relaxing.
  • Commit to doing the toe and foot exercises suggested by your podiatrist.

Treating Arthritic Feet
Arthritic feet shouldn't prevent you from carrying on with normal life and physical activities. Get help from a podiatrist as soon as you start to experience symptoms and take extra steps to care for your feet.

By FOOT & ANKLE CENTER OF ILLINOIS
July 30, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Blister  

A foot blister is a small pocket of fluid that forms on the foot. Blisters can be painful while they heal. Foot blisters are caused by several things, including friction, burns, contact with irritants, and autoimmune diseases. Treatment can alleviate your pain, prevent infection, and help heal your blister. Here's what to do when you keep getting blisters on your feet.

1. See a podiatrist- When foot blisters interfere with your normal activities, you should see a podiatrist. Podiatrists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of foot and ankle problems, including blisters. Depending on the cause of the foot blister, your podiatrist will form a treatment plan for you. 

2. Cover your blisters- If a blister does occur, do not pop it. A blister should be covered to reduce irritation and cut back on the risk of infection. Wash your blisters with soap and water and cover them with dressings, like bandages or gauze pads. Your dressings should be changed every day. 

3. Use antibiotic ointment- Antibiotic ointment helps prevent infections in blisters. You can purchase antibiotic ointment at a local pharmacy. Apply antibiotic ointment to the foot blisters as directed, especially before you put on your socks or shoes.

4. Keep your feet dry- Keep your feet dry at all times. After you shower, dry your feet thoroughly. Wear socks every day to keep moisture away from the skin of your feet. For sweaty feet, use products that help control moisture. 

5. Use custom orthotics- Orthotic devices are molded pieces of rubber, leather, or other material that are inserted into shoes. You can get custom-made orthotic devices from your podiatrist. Orthotic devices can be helpful in preventing and treating foot blisters. Orthotic devices can reduce friction on foot blisters and alleviate your pain. 

6. Wear the right shoes- Rubbing and pressure from shoes that are too tight often cause blisters on the feet. Avoid wearing shoes that cause foot blisters. Wear good-fitting footwear that fit comfortably and leave your feet with some wiggle room, especially on long walks or runs. Wearing the right footwear can prevent future blisters.

7. Use foot powders- Friction can make foot blisters worse and increase your pain. In order to reduce friction on blisters, buy a powder designed for your feet at a pharmacy. Pour it into your socks before putting on your shoes to reduce pain. If a powder causes your foot blisters to become irritated, stop using it.


Don't let foot blisters knock you off your feet. Find a podiatrist in your area and schedule an appointment. A podiatrist can help you get rid of those foot blisters once and for all. The journey to healthy feet starts with you!

By FOOT & ANKLE CENTER OF ILLINOIS
July 25, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ankle Sprains  

You've been running on an uneven surface in the local park. Every now and then, your left ankle would twist, but you kept going. Now at ankle sprainhome, that ankle is super sore. Is this an ankle sprain? At Foot and Ankle Center of Illinois, Dr. John Sigle and Dr. Grant Gonzalez treat numerous ankle sprains. While they are fully qualified in reconstructive surgeries, most sprains don't need surgical repair. Read about the signs of ankle sprains and how your Springfield, IL, podiatrist can help.

The anatomy of your ankle

Three bones and three ligaments make up your ankle: the talus bone, the tibia, the fibula, and the fibrous connective tissues which bind them together and allow the foot to move up and down, sideways and in a circular motion. While the ankle is made to be strong, certain stressors can fracture it, or more commonly, sprain it.

The most common kind of ankle sprain comes from sudden twisting movement from side to side. Typically sprains happen when running, stepping off a curb or step, playing basketball, or dancing. This twisting force partially or completely tears the supporting ligaments of the ankle.

Signs of sprains

The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society says that 25,000 Americans sprain their ankles every day. How do you recognize a sprain? Here are the signs and symptoms:

  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to the touch
  • Limited range of motion and ability to bear weight

Upon visual inspection and X-ray examination of injured ankles, orthopedic physicians and podiatrists grade sprains according to severity. Even the most severe sprains usually do not need surgical repair. However, prompt treatment of any sprain spares the patient long-term problems of ankle instability and limited mobility.

Treating ankle sprains

If you suspect an ankle sprain, call your podiatrist in his Springfield, IL, office right away. Most treatments are simple and involve common sense strategies such as:

  • Rest
  • Ice (20 minutes on and 20 off)
  • Compression with an elastic bandage to limit swelling and provide comfort and support
  • Elevation on a pillow above heart level
  • Stretch and do physical therapy as directed

Sometimes a more severe sprain requires a soft cast or crutches.

Preventing sprains

When you exercise, run, play tennis, and so on, wear well-supporting shoes. Be sure to warm up ahead of strenuous physical activity, and do targeted exercises to strengthen leg muscles. Keep near ideal weight. Finally, don't be sedentary during the week and then exercise super-strenuously on the weekends. Instead, incorporate a moderate amount of physical activity into your daily routine to maintain strength and flexibility and to avoid injury.

Contact us

If you think you have an ankle injury or any problem with the lower extremities, please contact Foot and Ankle Center of Illinois with locations in Springfield, Decatur, Carlinville, Shelbyville, Taylorville and Sullivan, IL. You'll enjoy precise care in a friendly, patient-centered atmosphere. Call us for an appointment today.





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